Client
National Institutes of Health


Project
Light-field miscoscopy for functional zebrafish imaging


Problem
Capture imaging data from a custom optical system at 125Gbps


Solutions & Expertise
Optics, sCMOS, FPGA, Data Acquisition, User Interface


Grant
Development for Lotus is supported by a Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health, under Award Number R43MH109332.

Lotus increases the spatial and temporal resolution of light-field microscopy by a combined factor of 100.


Light-field microscopy (LFM) is a functional, plenoptic imaging technique which offers ultrahigh spatial and temporal resolution for 3D tissue samples. The project, codenamed Lotus, is a collaboration between LeafLabs and the Synthetic Neurobiology Group at MIT. The goal is to record from every neuron in the zebrafish brain with single-unit resolution.

3D fluorescence imaging of the whole zebrafish brain in-vivo (from Prevedel 2014)

3D fluorescence imaging of the whole zebrafish brain in-vivo (from Prevedel 2014)

Experimental prototype showing the long working distance objective,  large tube lens, microlens array and camera sensor.

Experimental prototype showing the long working distance objective,  large tube lens, microlens array and camera sensor.

 

Implementation

The Lotus proposal calls for the use of 16 custom FPGA boards (based on the Willow architecture) recording in sync from an array of CMOS sensors. The anticipated data rate is 125 Gbps, or about 4 times as much as the ALICE detector at CERN.

For information about the Lotus project, contact neuro@leaflabs.com
 

Publications 

Robert Prevedel, etal. "Simultaneous whole-animal 3D imaging of neuronal activity using light-field microscopy". Nature Methods, 22 April 2014